Eye Tracking

Eye movements (saccades) are necessary for the physical act of reading and have been shown to relate to underlying cognitive and attentional processes during reading.

Good eye tracking is the ability to quickly and accurately move the eyes. Children with poor reading skills frequently show inaccurate fixation. Instead of the eyes landing instantly on the next letter or word, the eyes overshoot or undershoot, and the child loses his or her place. A corrective saccade needs to be made which slows down reading and causes comprehension to drop dramatically. If your child is great at telling you what a story is all about when read to but cannot do the same when he or she is reading, there is an eye tracking or other visual skill problem.

   


Developmental Eye Movement Test

See is you can complete the test below. Read the numbers from left to right as if you are reading a book. If there is a blank space continue across the same line to continue tracking. This exercise tests the eyes' ability to work as a team and concurrently with the brain to process the information. Give it a try.

  


Below are common symptoms of an eye tracking problem as published by the:  The American Optometric Association Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG): Learning Related Vision Problems:

Signs and Symptoms of Ocular Motility Dysfunction

 • Moving head excessively when reading

• Skipping lines when reading

• Omitting words and transposing words when reading

• Losing place when reading

• Requiring finger or marker to keep place when reading

• Experiencing confusion during the return sweep phase of reading

• Experiencing illusory text movement

• Having deficient ball-playing skills

Here at Yorba Linda Optometry and Beyond, a screening for deficient eye tracking skills are a part of every eye exam. If the screening suggests a problem, eye tracking skills are best diagnosed with a normed quantitative called the Developmental Eye Movement test. This is a quick 5 minute test performed in the office for no extra charge

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